Saturday, February 4, 2017

Choosing the right running shoe, a must for All runners

I was recently asked about how to pick the right sneakers to run in.  First, let me say that picking the right sneakers is extremely important, perhaps more so for the beginner or new runner.  The right sneaker, comfort, and staying injury free is crucial to running whether you jog a couple times a week or you hit the miles hard for race training.  Below, the chart on the right breaks it down.  You can figure out your arch one of a couple ways:

  1. Go to a local running store and have them watch you on the treadmill.  After a couple minutes, when you get off, they will then try to sell you a $120 sneaker.  Feel free to buy them, or ask whether you are a neutral, stability, or motion control shoe type.  Armed with your shoe type, hit the computer and search for shoes in your category. Try RunningWarehouse, RoadRunnerSports, or Amazon.
  2. At home, put some water in a cookie sheet on the floor, next to it place a paper bag on the floor.  After you step in the water, step directly onto the paper bag with both feet and then off of it.  Your foot should show up on the paper bag in some version of the diagram below.  Pick you shoe type by the impression your foot makes on the paper bag.
  3. Maybe you already know whether you have high or low arches.  If so, no test needed.  Simply pick your shoe type.

Final two points:
  1. Make sure you buy your shoes a half size bigger than your day to day sneaker if you are a jogger looking to add a few miles to your week.  If you are more serious, logging miles, and/or long runs, go a full size bigger that your day to day sneakers, like I do. 
  2. No cotton socks, splurge for some Dryfit at Target, or the running store!! 


Neutral shoes: They can work for mild pronators, but are best for neutral runners or people who supinate (tent to roll outward). These shoes provide some shock absorption and some medial (arch-side) support. Normal Arch
Stability shoes: Good for runners who exhibit mild to moderate overpronation. They often include a firm "post” to reinforce the arch side of each midsole, an area highly impacted by overpronation.  Low Arch
Motion control shoes: Best for runners who exhibit moderate to severe overpronation, they offer features such as stiffer heels or a design built on straighter lasts to counter overpronation.  High Arch

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